Iteration: dreams and ticktocks

GAK, Bremen, Photo: Constantin Engelmann

Temporal clusters are mind maps of Storelli’s artistic practice and are used as a tool in her artistic research chronomorphology: the study of how time changes shape. One cluster is a diagram of notions. Concepts are positioned and connected in relation to one another to create a resonance of meanings. This form of diagrammatic writing is used by the artist to navigate through her thinking and to describe a possible correlation of ideas. Sometimes these associations have developed into artworks; sometimes they could become one.

During this lecture a diagram drawn on the floor is performed. Through one iteration on the map, the artist tells a story of associations.

Temporal Clusters

GAK, Bremen, Photo: Jiwoo Park

Temporal clusters are mind maps of Storelli’s artistic practice and are used as a tool in her artistic research chronomorphology: the study of how time changes shape. One cluster is a diagram of notions. Concepts are positioned and connected in relation to one another to create a resonance of meanings. This form of diagrammatic writing is used by the artist to navigate through her thinking and to describe a possible correlation of ideas. Sometimes these associations have developed into artworks; sometimes they could become one.

vorstellen.network

screenshots from the website

During the shut down, we realised that there wasn’t any existing online tool that could canalise artistic exchange outside of corporate interests and market driven economies. We decided to create a situation in the digital realm where the sole purpose is sharing knowledge in poetic forms. vorstellen.network is a platform where artists can support new modes of interaction through writing. It is intended as a performative tool for poetic narrations. We long for it to create a living network that can flourish and illuminate from one screen to the other.

Mars Song

Performance at Haus am Lützowplatz Berlin, Photo: Billy Clarken

The imaginary field recording coming from the speakers reproduces a windy atmosphere. The sound is based on algorithms derived from the weather model by Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, IPSL Mars Climate Database. From the wind emerges a genderless voice, describing an imaginary stay on the planet.

Live, a mezzosopranist and a synth interact and dialogue with each other based on a canonic exercise by Augustin Maurs: the singer should reproduce three times, as accurately as she can, the sounds and pauses emitted by the synth. However, as the synth player plays more sounds than she could actually remember, this creates a composition based on human error, or imagination.

Mars is our planet of imagination. What we don’t seem feasible on earth we often project into a fictional narrative involving our fellow neighbour Mars. Throughout recent history we created maps, calendars, collected pictures or weather data of this planet. One could assume we seem to know it quite well. Just that we still don’t really know - what does it sound like on mars?

One sunray through the earth

Installation at Alte Münze Berlin, lat 52.52 lon 13.41

Every evening near Alexanderplatz one ray of sunlight shines fleetingly into the dark sky. The appearance of this phenomenon coincides with local noon on the exact opposite side of the planet longitude -166.59. The sunray slips through an imaginary slit in Earth’s blue sphere, reappearing to reach out into the middle of the Berlin night.

The artwork One Sunray through the Earth is inspired by astronomical instruments that connect the earth to the sky. It makes use of calculations and observations acquired over the centuries by great astronomers. However, the artwork twists the observation point around. It is not an instrument to study the sky, but rather it uses the sky to bring the attention back to Earth and to remind us playfully of our modest position in the solar system.

see onesunray.earth for more information

Salon am Moritz Platz, Berlin, Photo: Marietta Auras

During this lecture one oral story about the relationship between the human and the clock is told: Starting from the first mechanical inventions and developing into the struggle of being together at sea. I talk about the clock’s role for industrialisation, its growing importance in history and how it reaches the stars and accelerates society. How maybe this relationship is coming to an end with a separation… Humanity used clocks to structure time for society, triggering many technological and sociological developments. Their relationship has been changing since the beginning, as they grew and got old together. What, then, is becoming of time?

Time Piece (Martian Deadbeat)

Time Piece (Martian Deadbeat) is a clock built to tick with every Earth Second. Yet the pendulum is manipulated to swing as it would on Mars: because the gravity on Mars is weaker, the ticking is about 20% slower. The work is inspired by sci-fi. Mars is a metaphoric planet; many stories take place on its fantasized ground, with the intent to paraphrase terrestrial situations or dreams. The sculpture therefore beats to the time of imagination, transferring the martian ticktocking to Earth. It also reminds us that a time standard such as the Second is relative and that the shape of time we are used to, made of minutes and hours of a fixed duration, is nothing else but a convention.

EXP: j’aimerais commencer par sauter

LAC, Lugano

In the face of the common feeling of a constant impossible race against time, the piece EXP: je voudrais commencer par sauter ponders time as a place of infinite possibilities. This experience encourages an osmosis between the audience and the performers and aims to create practices for integrating the contemplative life with the active one. EXP: je voudrais commencer par sauter connects the language of the installation with that of the performance, so as to create a place that is time and that changes as it flows. The staging is a sound and visual landscape, a performative framework that, by translating the chosen abstract concept, itself becomes dramaturgy.

What is time?

Installed at Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin

What is time? is a series of hundreds of questions about one of the most common nouns used in the English language. The work deals with the variety of meanings, projections and speculations relating to time by asking questions about it ad absurdum. The interrogation itself becomes a para- phrase of this complex concept.

Atomistic

Performance at Walcheturm Zürich 2018
Performance at Walcheturm Zürich 2018, Photo: Lorenzo Pusterla

Atomistic is a dialogue between two artworks: Time Piece (Seconds) and Neocortex. Both works deal with ideas about the perception of time continuity and its division into smaller parts. Each of them, however, engages another of our senses. One is a polyrhythmic arrangement of pulsating lights, an impression-evoking visual work; the other is a slow-motion noise composition, an auditory experience. The first is one continuous oscillation, the latter is a narration developing in time, with a clear beginning and end. It is by combining the two in space that a multi-sensual experience is triggered. The two artworks influence and complement one another: one is eternal, the other represents an event. Thanks to the development of the sound narration it is possible to peer at Time Piece (Seconds) for a longer time. The auditory stimuli from Neocortex mislead our visual reception: sometimes the lights seem to pulsate differently.

Invito al viaggio

Invito al viaggio (Invitation to a journey) is a performative sculpture. The visitor is invited to assemble the fragments of the jigsaw puzzle together. The pictures featured on the puzzle are those of stars and galaxies, so that multiple parameters related to time mingle together: daydreaming, reflection, and the abstract idea of the Universe Space-Time continuum.

Ieri ricordato domani

Installation view nine to five, Grand Palais, Bern, Photo: Nico Müller

Ieri ricordato domani (trans: yesterday remembered tomorrow) is a single shot video of a clock moving between two temporal units: “Yesterday” and “tomorrow” become abstract parameters and as evanescent as any momento: Duration, time’s own essence, disappears in our memory. The Swiss train clock that stands for precision, punctuality and reliability loses its function and value. With it, the idea of a “day“ is reduced to the arbitrary length of one minute and a circular, repetitive movement.

Reality Glitch

Reality Glitch is a public installation composed of two windsock, one is the official white and red wind signal, the other is white and grey. The classical red flag shows the wind direction, the grey one instead points against the wind, messing up with the viewers visual perception. For the traveling public exhibition Grand Tour – Le acque dell’ovest at Lago Maggiore, the glitch traveled from Verbania (I), via Cannobio (I), Brissago (CH) to Locarno (CH)

Time Piece (The Mysterious Island)

Time Piece (The Mysterious Island), a public installation, Time Piece (UTC -10h), a mechanical bell, and the publication 35°60’S, 150°38’W are three works that relocate to Locarno the passing of time on Ernest-Legouvé Reef. Discovered in the beginning of the 20th century, near the location of the fictitious Lincoln island of Jules Verne’s book ‘The Mysterious Island’, the reef has since been reported in many atlases, even though it doesn’t appear to exist anymore. Time Piece (The Mysterious Island) is a night sundial that shows the time with a beam of light, representing the shadow that a vertical sundial would produce on the island. Light becomes the shadow of a neverland. Time Piece (UTC -10h) strikes every full hour with the time in the mysterious island’s time zone. Printed on the postcard 35°60’S, 150°38’W and on the wall is the satellite image of the location where the island should be found.

Time Piece (UTC -10h)

Time Piece (The Mysterious Island), a public installation, Time Piece (UTC -10h), a mechanical bell, and the publication 35°60’S, 150°38’W are three works that relocate to Locarno the passing of time on Ernest-Legouvé Reef. Discovered in the beginning of the 20th century, near the location of the fictitious Lincoln island of Jules Verne’s book ‘The Mysterious Island’, the reef has since been reported in many atlases, even though it doesn’t appear to exist anymore. Time Piece (The Mysterious Island) is a night sundial that shows the time with a beam of light, representing the shadow that a vertical sundial would produce on the island. Light becomes the shadow of a neverland. Time Piece (UTC -10h) strikes every full hour with the time in the mysterious island’s time zone. Printed on the postcard 35°60’S, 150°38’W and on the wall is the satellite image of the location where the island should be found.

Notes for a travelogue

Sin1.0

sin1.0 in Atina, Italy
Time Piece (Additive Synthesis Bell), Motto Berlin
This installation changes time in Town. Its bell strikes the hours according to the sci-fi time System Sin 1.0. In place of the regular hours in UTC time, the hours in system sin 1.0 are spread along a sinusoidal curve, so that their duration varies throughout the day. In system sin 1.0 time, as in ancient Rome, day and night are fixed by sunrise and sunset. Between these solar events, sin hours shorten towards noon and midnight.

Time Piece (Beginning)

Photo: André Wunstorf

Time Piece (Beginning) merges three time systems together; all share the same division of the day into 24 hours of equal length. The sculpture displays Babylonian, local and Italian time and blinks each system in alteration every 100 milliseconds. The Babylonian time system has its day starting at sunrise, and it is blinked yellow. Local time, in our well-known UTC system, is white, and its day starts at midnight. Finally, the Italian time system starts at sunset and is shown in red.

Time Piece (All the Time of the World)

The sculpture is wall mounted at about a two-meter height and has the size of a common wall clock. The azure disk turns imperceptibly slowly clock-wise on itself, though the motor and gears are noisy and visibly moving. One complete rotation of the disk is the same duration of the sidereal day of the earth: 23 hours, 56 minutes and 4 seconds, the time that our planet needs to make one rotation along its axis

IN

Parking lots are functional architectonic construction, an important builded sign of our society. Their necessity make them visible everywhere, but by being blind spots of the city map, a sort of non-place, they became pop-myths’ crime favorite location. Walking through a car park means going fast, avoiding people, whispering and reluctantly getting hold back. The video work stages the tension between the functionality of this kind of location and the psychological behavior formed during the last decades throughout narratives. Short performative acts based on classical scenes stereotypes modulate the space; the architecture seems to coldly swallow the performers. The sound and the music is played and recorded on location. Modified by the architecture, and naturally mixed with the surrounding soundscape.

CAST Muriel and Giorgia Del Don, Philipp Klein, Matthias Klein, Clemens Jahn

PRODUCTION, DIRECTION, EDITING Elisa Storelli and Nadja Krüger CINEMATOGRAPHY Nadja Krüger SOUND Constantin Engelmann, Elisa Storelli SOUND MIX Jochen Jezussek CO-PRODUCTION Institute for Time Based Media, University of the Arts Berlin

Trillenium

Trillenium is a musical improvisation played live. It uses chaotic systems and their behaviour in time and space. During the performance the duo plays a hybrid system, consisting of analog circuits, a hand-builtmodular synthesizer and sound algorithms implemented in the program Supercollider.

untitled (desideri)

The sculpture is made of a group of party balloons, tied together in pairs. The balloons are held to the ground by a half ring of ice. They want to fly away, but the uplift they need only lasts for a few hours. The ice is melting. Both processes run at nonlinear speeds determined by the air temperature. This creates a precarious balance.

Quodlibet

Quodibet is a hybrid between a sculpture and an instrument. It is composed of four elements, with a wheel of Entade Rheedii seeds at the top. When a tower is activated the wheel starts to turn. The speed and direction of rotation can vary. The sounds of the motors are picked up and amplified. The instrument can be used as a sculpture to play in the room where it is placed, with a generative composition that the Quodlibet creates by itself.

Alexanderplatz

Shot at Berlin Alexanderplatz, the performative short movie Alexanderplatz plays with the location. Alexanderplatz is a well-known symbol of Berlin, a must-see for tourists, and a transit or shopping area for the people who live in the city. With this film we explore the public square, its historical and contemporary architecture and the people interacting with it. The actions of the usual passenger are sometimes underlined and emphasized by seven performers, who interpret their own ideas about Alexanderplatz. The architecture is shown casually, not to describe the place in a continuous way or to give a map to the viewer, but to form a composition that can only exist on the screen. The film is a subjective documentary. The story it narrates is implicitly shown in the images. It’s a contemporary portrait of a historical part of Berlin, which was destroyed during the 2nd World War, then rebuild by the German Democratic Republic and now it’s slowly being destroyed again. Partly by building new old styled architectures or new gigantic shopping malls. Through that process the proportion of the former architectural ensemble disappears and new buildings imbalance the surrounding structure. Simultaneously, the people being there day after day build the real public square. With their interactions, they unknowingly modify and acknowledge the constructions all around. In fact, they represent Alexanderplatz and they’re absolutely what’s the most interesting to see.

CAST Christin Wilke, Philipp Klein, Constantin Engelmann, Mario Saravanja, Marcel Engelmann, Juliane Köhler and many more.

PRODUCTION, DIRECTION, EDITING Elisa Storelli and Nadja Krüger CINEMATOGRAPHY Nadja Krüger SOUND Constantin Engelmann, Elisa Storelli SOUND MIX Jochen Jezussek CO-PRODUCTION Institute for Time Based Media, University of the Arts Berlin

Petrolio (Assemblaggio n1)

Video: Nadja Krüger

A poetic machine that drips oil and tries to burn it. It produces, along with smoke and smell, the waste of oil and electricity. The latter energy is used to waste the former, and wastes itself as well. Electricity maintains its characteristic invisibility, and is overshadowed by the presence of oil, with its unpleasant byproducts. The machine is a paraphrase of energy consumption and production: a certain amount has to be wasted in order to create more of it. Oil and electricity could be seen as the symbols of our society: like ancient rituals, an amount of the most valuable goods are sacrificed, brought to the altar of progress and consumerism.

This machine will not switch herself off

Video: Nadja Krüger

The human breath–and the impossibility of suffocating ourself wwas the initial inspiration for this work. That’s why this machine is built and programmed to make herself try to turn off, without ever succeeding.